Getting Your Cat Fixed: Why It’s Important To Spay (Or Neuter)

Posted: February 7, 2022 by Anita

getting your cat fixed
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Are you asking yourself why you should get your cat spayed (or neutered)? Or maybe you’re not asking yourself that question because what is the big deal?

But yeah, it’s kinda is a big deal.

There are tons of reasons why getting your cat fixed benefits not only you but also your cat and your community.

This article discusses why getting a cat fixed is a good idea.

Getting your cat spayed – what does it mean?

Spaying is the sterilization of female cats.

What’s involved when female cats get spayed

The medical term for spaying a female cat is ovariohysterectomy. It is major surgery for your cat, and she will need to go under general anesthesia.

A small incision is made right below your cat’s belly button during the operation. Then, the ovaries and uterus are removed, and the incision is closed up with several layers of sutures.

Possible complication of surgery

Complications during surgery are usually rare. However, here’s a list of possible problems during and after surgery:

  • internal bleeding
  • infections
  • reaction to anesthesia (be sure your cat doesn’t eat past midnight before surgery)
  • reaction to sutures
  • sinus or drainage formation of surgical site

What to expect post-surgery

After the surgery, your cat will be allowed to go home. Expect her to be a little out of it and probably won’t be hungry.

Your cat is going to be a bit sore for a few days. Ensure she has easy access to food, water, and the litter box.

Why should I get my cat spayed?

Getting a cat neutered will be one of the most important decisions you’ll make. Getting your cat fixed could save your cat’s life.

Okay, you might be thinking she’s over-reaching a bit but hear me out.

  • It eliminates the risk of ovarian and uterine cancer
  • it reduces the risk of breast cancer in your cat with there being a less than 1% chance of her developing it if she is spayed before her first heat cycle.
  • decreases the chances of hormone-related diseases
  • A study done by Banfield Hospital showed that the life expectancy of a cat that has been spayed is 39% longer than female cats not spayed

Other benefits to getting your cat spayed

  • prevents unwanted births
  • helps reduce overpopulation in shelters (unadopted cats and kittens are sometimes euthanized
  • helps prevent tragic outcomes such as starvation, trauma, exposure homelessness of cats that are abandoned
  • can prevent sexual behaviors such as spraying, loud female cat noises when in heat that are considered irritating by humans

When should cats be spayed

A healthy cat as young as six weeks can be spayed. Early sterilization of kittens is done (usually before they leave the shelter or cat sanctuary) because it’s thought that if left up to the cat owner, they won’t get it done at all.

However, don’t be surprised if your Vet tells you to wait until your kitten is 5-6 months of age. At 5-6 months of age, a kitten is a good size and will do well post-procedure.

Keep in mind that some breeds such as Burmese and Siamese can reach puberty (and have kittens) anywhere from 4-6 months.

getting your cat fixed

Getting your cat neutered – what does it mean

Neutering is the sterilization of male cats. Historically, the male of most species who isn’t being groomed for breeding purposes is sterilized. Male hormones can bring out the beast in male cats, so sterilization can make them a little tamed.

What’s involved when male cats get neutered

The medical term for neutering or castration of a male cat is called an orchidectomy. It is major surgery for your cat, and he will need to go under general anesthesia.

An incision is made over each side of the scrotal sac during the operation. Then, the testicles (and male hormones) are removed, and the incision is closed up with several layers of sutures.

Possible complication of surgery

Complications during surgery are usually rare. However, here’s a list of possible problems during and after surgery:

  • inflammation
  • infections
  • reaction to anesthesia (be sure your cat doesn’t eat past midnight before surgery)
  • swelling of surgical site

What to expect post-surgery

After the surgery, your cat will be allowed to go home. Expect him to be a little woozy and not very hungry. Provide a quiet place for him to recover. Your cat is going to be a bit sore for a few days. Ensure he has easy access to food, water, and the litter box.

Not sure how to make your cat happy? Read my article, “What Cats Need To Be Happy” by clicking here.

Why should I get my cat neutered?

Getting a cat neutered will be one of the most important decisions you’ll make. The benefits of neutering a cat are numerous, and in this section, I discuss why you should consider it.

  • Your cat might behave better – while getting your cat fixed most likely won’t make him a calmer cat (it didn’t help calm my cat, Theo) – it will change behaviors that are affected by male hormones such as reducing roaming, urine spraying and fights with the neighborhood cats.

  • He will live longer – a study done by Banfield Hospital showed that the life expectancy of a cat that has been neutered is 62% longer than male cats not neutered.

  • A single male cat can father loads and loads of kittens. You will be doing your part as a concerned cat lover by not contributing to the overpopulation of cats and getting your cat neutered.

  • Neutering reduces the chances of your cat getting testicular or prostate cancer.

When should cats be neutered?

Several research studies support getting your cat neutered as early as five months of age. If you decide to get your cat from a shelter, the surgery will most likely be done before adopting.

How much is it to get a cat fixed?

The cost of getting your cat fixed can run anywhere from $200-$500. Neutering surgery for male cats is near the low end of the range, with spaying surgery for female cats costing more.

If you adopt your cat from a shelter, cat rescue, or any other type of non-profit animal welfare agency, most neuter/spaying will either be free or low cost.

Another option (the one I chose to do because my daughter found my cat Theo on the street) is through pet insurance. The pet insurance I purchased through Pet’s Best covered the cost of Theo’s neutering surgery.

Are you looking for a low-cost spay/neuter clinic in your area? Not sure where you can go to get your cat spayed/neutered? Go to the ASPCA website or the Humane Society website for help.

Conclusion

This article discussed why getting a cat fixed is a good idea.

The medical term for spaying a female cat is ovariohysterectomy. The medical term for neutering or castration of a male cat is called an orchidectomy. It is major surgery for your cat and will need to go under general anesthesia.

Complications during surgery are usually rare. Your cat is going to be a bit sore for a few days. Make sure it has easy access to food, water, and the litter box.

Cats that are fixed live longer – a study was done by Banfield Hospital showed that the life expectancy of a cat that has been neutered is 62% longer than male cats not neutered.

The cost of getting your cat fixed can run anywhere from $200-$500. Neutering surgery for male cats is near the low end of the range, with spaying surgery for female cats costing more.

By getting your cat fixed, you will be doing your part as a concerned cat lover by not contributing to the overpopulation of cats.

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